Treasures

Step right up, ladies and gentlemen! Hear ye hear ye — here ye will find all sorts of priceless booty from Peg’s Private Collection. Never before seen videos of Ethel and Albert, her half hour television series on NBC, ABC and CBS. Ten minute Ethel and Albert segments from The Kate Smith Hour. Original recordings from WTBO in 1942 with Willis Conover as “Albert”. Tapes of Peg and Walter Hart discussing plot lines. Videos from recent Old Time Radio convention performances. Interviews. Photos. Letters. Contracts. Scrapbooks, snippets, scripts to download, original signed scripts for sale — all sorts of special Peg Stuff that I will keep changing every month (or whenever I feel like it, or remember).

Television Shows

Watch this FREE video of Ethel and Albert, Peg's half hour television series on NBC. Episode no. 37: The Income Tax. Performed and recorded live on February 27, 1954.

Audio Recordings

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Here is where you hang out to chuckle over, oh let’s see, The Couple Next Door, vintage Ethel and Albert, The Little Things in Life, Peg’s NBC Radio Monitor shows, live performances, recorded interviews, conversations — whatever turns up.

Scripts

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Peg thought it might be nice for you to be able to read an actual “paper” script of hers now and again. “What a good idea, Mama!” I said. 

Three months later, by which time I was grabbing anyone who made the mistake of coming through her front door to show them how a scanner works, however ill-suited to the task they appeared, although the Terminex man was in fact not too bad at it — we succeeded in digitizing a little over four thousand of my mother’s radio and television comedy scripts. The ones that aren’t straight or have two first pages are the ones I did. 

Scrapbooks and Photos

All scrapbooks, while not completely chronological, have nevertheless been compiled with as much due care and attention as possible by (the extremely patient) Astrid King, using pages from the original albums put together by Peg Lynch herself in the 1950s — many of which were then torn apart with I think we can safely say, less due care and attention, by Peg Lynch herself in 2012, when she decided, for reasons that escape her daughter, that she needed to make nine million copies of everything on the not-very-good-or-big-enough printer in the dining room.